• Landquest 01
  • Landquest 04
  • Landquest 02
  • Landquest 05
    Marketing British Columbia to the World®
    Photo01 15 photos

    5.15 Private Acres in the Beautiful Region of Bowron Lake, BC

    Cariboo Chilcotin Listing No. 20176

    Tired of sharing the lake with other people? This flat 5.15-acre property with trees & river frontage, located across the road from the famous Bowron Lake, is the private getaway you have been craving. Perfect location to build the cabin of your dreams & forge new memories.


    Price
    $80,000

    Size
    5.15 acres

    Thumb photo01
    Thumb photo02
    Thumb photo03
    Thumb photo04
    Thumb photo05
    Thumb photo06
    Thumb photo07 +8 photos

    Description

    5.15 private acres in the beautiful region of Bowron Lake, BC. The property is nice and flat making it ideal for the construction of a house, cabin, barn or to create pasture for horses. Antler Creek frames the western boundary of the property.

    Bowron Lake is only a couple hundred metres from the property and offers excellent fishing, boating and exploratory opportunities. The peaceful solitude makes this property a perfect location for a summer cabin getaway.

    The property was selectively logged years ago, but still has large stands of mature timber. The region and property has an enormous amount of wildlife and sightseeing opportunities.

    Adjacent to the property is an additional 8 acres for sale (Listing 20175).

    Location

    The property is located on the westside of Bowron Lake Park Rd and metres away from Bowron Lake.

    Access

    The property is accessed from Quesnel by heading east on the Barkerville Highway (Highway 26). Just prior to reaching the town of Barkerville, you will turn to head east on Bowron Lake Park Rd. The property is approximately 26 km from this intersection.

    Area Data

    The Cariboo Region of British Columbia has a total approximate population of 127,900. Manufacturing, forestry, mining, oil and gas are the most prominent sources of employment through the region with manufacturing leading the way at 12% of total employment. The Government of British Columbia has predicted regional job growth at 0.4% per annum out to 2022 at which point regional job openings will reach 30,330.

    The town of Quesnel is located at the confluence of the Quesnel and Fraser Rivers. It is the commercial center for some 23,000 residents and is serviced by diverse rail, road and air networks. The Quesnel Airport is directly north of town and services all domestic air travel needs.

    The Quesnel economy has traditionally been orientated around the timber industry. There are numerous mills, which currently operate in the region providing stable predictable employment. West Fraser Integrated Forest Company, one of the most prominent players in British Columbia’s timber industry, operates several corporate offices in Quesnel. Other prominent industries in Quesnel include agriculture, mining and service/support companies for northern resource development and extraction.

    Bowron Lake Provincial Park is a provincial park located in northern British Columbia, roughly 117 km (73 mi) east of the city of Quesnel. Other nearby towns include Wells and the historic destination of Barkerville. Once a popular hunting and fishing destination, today the park is protected and known for its abundant wildlife, rugged glaciated mountains, and numerous freshwater lakes.

    The park's standout attraction is the 116 km (72 mi) recreational paddling circuit through the Cariboo Mountains, which connects a majority of the park's lakes via waterways and short portages, and has been named one of the top 10 canoe trips in the world. The park is open to a limited number of canoes and kayaks each year from May 15 to September 30.

    Recreation

    The region surrounding the property is famous for its outdoor recreational opportunities. The following activities are available:

    Hunting

    The property sits in Management Unit 5-13 offering hunting opportunities for whitetail deer, mule deer, moose, bear and game bird species. The property itself houses abundant wildlife particularly mule deer, moose and bear.

    Snowmobiling/Off-Roading

    The entire region surrounding the property is famous for its snowmobiling opportunities. There is ample annual snow fall to ensure plenty of snowmobiling opportunity. The property itself is excellent for all manner of off-road activities.

    Cross-Country Skiing

    The same snow, which affords excellent snowmobiling opportunity provides excellent slope and trail conditions. What better way to explore the property and surrounding countryside than on a pair of cross-country skis.

    Boating/Fishing

    Some of the best trout fishing opportunities in the province are mere minutes away from the property. Bowron Lake offers some of the best spring and fall rainbow trout fishing particularly for fly fisherman.

    Hiking/Camping

    With all the surrounding Crown land and nature the options for hiking and camping are endless.

    Urban Recreation

    With Quesnel located close to the property, there is plenty of urban recreational opportunities available. There are fitness centers, pools, restaurants, bars and everything else you could possibly need.

    History

    The first major arrival of European settlers in the area around Bowron Lake Park came with the Cariboo gold rush in the 1860s, which was centred in the nearby town of Barkerville. While little gold mining happened within the modern boundaries of the park, miners and prospectors were the first Europeans to regularly visit Bowron Lake (then called Bear Lake) and the surrounding area.

    The Bowron and Cariboo mountains were continuously explored through the mid- to late-1800s. While the Canadian Pacific Railway searched for links through the mountain passes, John Bowron, the Gold Commissioner, sent exploration parties into the hills to establish mining routes into gold-bearing ground. One of these routes followed the Goat River pass, connecting the Cariboo region to the Tête Jaune Cache in the Robson Valley, and was well-established enough to allow for dog sleds in the winter. This trail was eventually made obsolete when the Grand Trunk Railroad was finalized in 1914.

    On 31 March 1917, Bowron Lake was adopted as the official name of the lake previously known as Bear Lake, to honour John Bowron—though some maps had started using this name as early as 1914. John Bowron himself died in 1906, and was extremely involved with the mining industry in Barkerville throughout his life. The park would later inherit the same name as the lake.

    Map Reference

    53°15'12.57"N and 121°25'4.40"W

    Tax Details

    $412 (2020)

    Zoning

    RR2

    Legal

    Lot 1 DL 9517 Cariboo District Plan 22651
    PID 008-878-501

    Maps & Plans

    Map01

    Maps & Plans

    Our property descriptions and geographical information are taken from the BC Assessment Authority, Land Titles Office, government maps and other sources. While LandQuest® does not guarantee the information, we believe it to be accurate, but should not be relied upon without verification. This communication is not intended to cause or induce breach of an existing agency agreement.