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    Marketing British Columbia to the World®
    Spirit lake waterfront 01 14 photos

    Quite a Unique Salt Spring Island Acreage

    Vancouver Island & Southern Gulf Islands Listing No. 22235

    160-acre view property in the southern highlands of Salt Spring. 7.5-acre private lake, water rights and drilled well ensure precious water supply. 615 ft2 yurt, new solar system, and generator for enjoyment till you build your dream. Zoning provides development potential. Good road access.


    Price
    $2,987,000

    Size
    160 acres

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    Thumb spirit lake waterfront 07 +7 photos

    Description

    Spring fed Spirit Lake (approx. 7.5 acres) lies fully within the property and has a healthy population of smallmouth bass. The small dam has recently been thoroughly studied by professionals and has been reclassified with the Province. Views of the southern gulf islands, Vancouver, the San Jaun Islands and mainland USA are available from much of the property. Some of the property wraps onto the west side of the mountain and offers views of Vancouver Island.

    The property is blessed with a good road network to provide access to the lake and adjoining view site, other roads take you to the well constructed 615 ft2 yurt. Another fork takes you to a great building site, featuring a drilled well and a large 4000W solar array with an AC inverter and back up 7000W Honda generator—all protected in a double ended very secure 20 foot Sea Can metal container.

    A rare opportunity to buy densities on Salt Spring Island. The F1 (Forestry) zoning does allow for future subdivision into 20-acre sites and development. Each 20-acre site could have a main dwelling as an accessory cottage up to 1,000 ft2 and a home based-business. Some logging took place some 20+ years ago, so the property has very robust forest cover throughout and the property is a mix of mostly second and third growth and has significant value. Or cluster the density on 35% of the site as allowed under the Official Community Plan through rezoning.

    Water is abundant on the property with a nearly 7.5 acre lake with an estimated storage capacity of 80,000 m3 and an active water licence with the province for the use.

    Access

    From the Fulford-Ganges Road turn south on Isabella Point Road for approx. 500 m and then veer right on Musgrave Road and stay on it (at 2.25 km do not go down Dubois Road) for approx. 5.2 km. On the right a tree has a sign saying “NOTICE Land on both sides of the road is private property” and a bit more writing . . . you are now at the east boundary of the property.

    Vegetation

    Typical Gulf Island vegetation including pine, fir, cedar, grand fir and salal

    Recreation

    The island is also the perfect place to practice yoga or other wellness pursuits at numerous studios and retreats, and it also has public tennis, pickleball and squash courts, an indoor pool and a beautiful golf course and disc golf course too.

    Visitors who want to get out and enjoy Salt Spring’s natural beauty have many places to explore. The island is home to seven notable peaks and dozens of walking and hiking trails.

    Most public beach access points are clearly marked. Often these open onto unexpected vistas, nestled between quiet residential areas. Try the beach at the end of Baker Road, not far from Ganges, or at the island’s far north at Southey Point. Vesuvius Beach has the warmest ocean water for swimming, and while it’s chillier at Beddis Beach on the island’s east side, the sandy beach and scenery make it an ideal picnic spot. Boat, kayak, paddleboard and fishing tours are all ways to enjoy the waters around the island.

    History

    Salt Spring Island was the first in the Colony of Vancouver Island and British Columbia to allow settlers to acquire land through pre-emption: settlers could occupy and improve the land before purchase, being permitted to buy it at a cost per acre of one dollar after proving they had done so. Before 1871 (when the merged Colony of British Columbia joined Canada), all property acquired on Salt Spring Island was purchased in this way; between 1871 and 1881, it was still by far the primary method of land acquisition, accounting for 96% of purchases. As a result, the history of early settlers on Salt Spring Island is unusually detailed.

    Demographically, early settlers of the island included not only African Americans, but also Hawaiians, First Nation peoples, and British Isles settlers, including English, Irish and Scottish. The method of land purchase helped to ensure that the land was used for agricultural purposes and that the settlers were mostly families. Ruth Wells Sandwell in Beyond the City Limit indicates that few of the island's early residents were commercial farmers, with most families maintaining subsistence plots and supplementing through other activities, including fishing, logging and working for the colony's government. Some families later abandoned their land as a result of lack of civic services on the island or other factors, such as the livestock-killing cold of the winter of 1862.

    Boundaries

    Please see mapping section (all boundaries are approximate).

    Map Reference

    48°45'25.25"N and 123°29'37.10"W

    Services

    Cellphone

    Improvements

    600+ ft2 yurt, drilled 4 gpm well and a large 4000W solar array with an AC inverter and back up 7000W Honda generator all protected in a double ended very secure 20 foot Sea Can metal container.

    Tax Details

    $3,965.52 (2022)

    Zoning

    F1 - Forestry Zone

    Legal

    THE SOUTH EAST 1/4 OF SECTION 50, SOUTH SALT SPRING ISLAND, COWICHAN DISTRICT
    PID 009-743-545

    Maps & Plans

    Map01

    Maps & Plans

    Our property descriptions and geographical information are taken from the BC Assessment Authority, Land Titles Office, government maps and other sources. While LandQuest® does not guarantee the information, we believe it to be accurate, but should not be relied upon without verification. This communication is not intended to cause or induce breach of an existing agency agreement.